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As your baby transitions to solid foods, he’ll still get most of his nutrients from breast milk or formula. Think of solids not only as extra nutrition, but also as an opportunity for him to experience new textures and flavours, while practicing the oral motor skills necessary for spoon-feeding.
The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends starting solids when your baby is around 6 months old. Here are developmental cues: Can your baby hold his head up? Does he watch you eat or eye your food as it moves from your spoon to your mouth? If you answer yes, then he might be ready to try solids.
The Canadian Paediatric Society recommends waiting a few days before introducing each new food so that if your baby has an adverse reaction (such as an upset tummy, vomiting, diarrhea or a rash), you can more easily pinpoint the culprit. An easy way to track is to keep a food diary, updated every time you add a new food. You can also use the diary to note what your baby likes and dislikes.
Your baby’s first “solids” will be nearly liquid, but as the weeks and months pass, you’ll start to offer him more chunky meals. To keep him from choking, avoid nuts, raw carrots, string cheese, popcorn, marshmallows, hard, sticky, or round candy, raisins and other small dried fruit, hot dogs and grapes (unless they’re seedless and cut into quarters). Also, always keep a watchful eye on your baby during meals, and don’t let him eat in a moving car.
Did you know that solids are “extras”?

When can babies eat solid foods?

How often should I introduce new foods?
Concerned about choking hazards?

Starting Solids

He's growing so fast
Give him the vitamins he needs.
Support your baby’s growth and changing nutritional needs with age-appropriate vitamins.
* Demandez au médecin de votre bébé si Tri-Vi-Sol ou Poly-Vi-Sol lui convient.
1 Comité de la santé des Premières nations, des Inuits et des Métis et Société canadienne de pédiatrie.
Les suppléments de vitamine D : Recommandations pour les mères et leur nourrisson au Canada. Pediat Child Health 2007 (réaffirmation en octobre 2010); 12(7):583-9.
2 Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for calcium and vitamin D. Novembre 2010.
Find Enfamil Vitamins at most pharmacies throughout Canada.

Introducing solid food to your baby.

How to introduce solid food to a baby?

If you’re formula feeding, consider switching at six months to a next stage formula, such as Enfamil A 2, that is designed to help nourish his growing brain and body. Enfamil A+ 2 has a nutritional blend that helps support strong bodies and bones in growing babies, age-appropriate levels of calcium and iron, and DHA, a type of Omega-3 fat that is a building block of the brain
When and how should I introduce solid food to my baby?

Baby solid food chart

6 month
Signs of Readiness
Shows interest in food
Sits up in a high chair
Opens mouth wide when offered food on spoon
Foods
Breast milk
Infant formula, cow’s milk based
Pureed
Semi solid
Mashed
Consistency
Liquid intake:
500-1030 mL/day
(4-5 servings)
Solid food intake:
30-60 mL (2-4 tbsp) per serving
2-3 times a day
Quantity
7-8 months
Shows interest in food
Enjoys holding food
Begins chewing in a circular motion
Signs of Readiness
Breast milk
Infant formula, cow’s milk based
Foods
Crunchy but easy to dissolve
Ground or soft
Mashed with tiny soft lumps
Finely chopped
Consistency
Liquid intake:
470-1090 mL/day (4-5 servings)
Solid food intake:
30-60 mL (2-4 tbsp) per serving

Start with 2-3 times per day and increase to 3-4 times per day based on your baby’s appetite
Quantity
9-12 months
Signs of Readiness
Begins to use a sippy cup
Tries to use a spoon
Improved grasp and finger-feeding
Breast milk
Infant formula, cow’s milk based
3.25% cow’s milk*
Foods
Bite sized pieces
Increased texture
Coarsely chopped
Finger foods
Consistency
Liquid intake:
300-980 mL/day (3-4 servings)
Solid food intake:
3 meals & 2 snacks
Quantity
12-18 months
Begins to use a spoon and fork
Feeds at regular times
Drinks from an open cup with assistance
Signs of Readiness
Breast milk
Infant formula, cow’s milk based
3.25% cow’s milk*
Toddler drink
Foods
Transitions to the family diet
Variety of textures
Bite sized pieces
Finger foods
Consistency
Liquid intake:
500-750 mL/day (2-3 servings)
Solid food intake:
3 meals & 2 snacks Increase portion sizes as needed based on your baby’s appetite
Quantity
*Health Canada,The Canadian Paediatric Society, The Dietitians of Canada and the Breastfeeding Committee For Canada recommends not introducing pasteurized whole cow’s (3.25%) until at least 9-12 months of age.
Remember: The amount and type of food your baby or toddler eats will vary. Your baby or toddler will refuse the bottle when they are no longer hungry. This is only a guide.
Feeding milestones
For more information about your growing baby feeding milestones, read Growing baby milestones.

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As he starts solids, you need to ensure your baby is getting all the nutrients he needs.

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Did you know that even if you have a family history of allergy there is no need to delay the introduction of any specific solid foods?
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What to know about starting solids

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