bluegraphic-goes-on-footer
BEBE_PARA_REEMPLAZAR_EN_feeding_problems
feeding problems: how to handle them
Feeding time can be an amazing experience you share with your baby, but it can also have its share of challenges. Concerns like fussiness, gas or frequent spit-up are common whether you’re breastfeeding or formula-feeding, especially during your baby’s first 3 or 4 months when his digestive system is still developing.
 
More often than not, there is nothing to be overly worried about. Here are some tips that might help ease your baby’s common feeding challenges, but please talk to your baby’s doctor if you have concerns.
Newborn_inBlue_C44R7379
A guide for dealing with common feeding time challenges including fussiness, spitting-up and colic
Feeding time can be an amazing experience you share with your baby, but it can also have its share of challenges. Concerns like fussiness, gas or frequent spit-up are common whether you’re breastfeeding or formula-feeding, especially during your baby’s first 3 or 4 months when his digestive system is still developing.
 
More often than not, there is nothing to be overly worried about. Here are some tips that might help ease your baby’s common feeding challenges, but please talk to your baby’s doctor if you have concerns.
sumpage-background-shape2Newborn_inBlue_C44R7379sumpage-background-shape2
Frequent spit up What causes it? A tiny stomach and still-maturing digestive system that lets stomach contents back up during or shortly after feedings.
 
Signs to look for. The spitting up of one or two mouthfuls of breast milk or formula. Larger spit-ups can occur after overfeeding. Normal spitting up usually does not cause any crying.
 
What to do? Spitting up is very common. A little is harmless, but if you feel it is causing your baby some discomfort, you can try these tips:
  • Keep your baby in an upright position for 20 to 30 minutes after feeding.
  • Burp her frequently—about every five minutes throughout feeding time. This will keep air from building up in her digestive tract.
  • Avoid activity after feeding that might keep food from settling in her stomach.
  • Check the flow of her bottle. It should be coming out one drop at a time, not in a steady stream. You can adjust the tightness of the bottle-top screw ring, or change to a slower flow nipple.
  • Reduce pacifier time. Your baby might be swallowing too much air.
  • Calm your baby down before feeding. If she is frantic, stressed or rushed, it may contribute to spitting up.
  • Give smaller feedings more often to reduce the chances of spit-up.
  • If you are concerned, talk to your baby’s doctor.
A guide for dealing with common feeding time challenges including fussiness, spitting-up and colic
feeding problems: how to handle them
feeding problems:
how to handle them
Newborn_inBlue_C44R7379